2018

Keep Your Pup Safe This July 4th

July 5th sees a huge spike in the number of dogs reported lost.

And it’s no wonder. Our dogs have no idea the loud noises outside are part of a celebration and it’s easy for them to get scared enough to run off and get lost.

Here are some tips to make sure your dog is safe on this otherwise fun holiday.

Keep them inside

Even dogs who are normally calm and unbothered by things like vacuum cleaners and thunderstorms can get spooked by fireworks. Dogs have been known to jump fences, wriggle out of their collars and yank the leash from their owner’s hand in an attempt to get away from the noise. Even if your dog has never run off or escaped your backyard, it’s better to be safe than sorry and to shield them from unnecessary stress.

If you’re having guests over, make sure they know to be careful at the exits and not let your dog out or crate him until the party is over.

 Alum Brody, chillin' in his crate

Alum Brody, chillin' in his crate

Make sure they’re wearing ID tags

If your dog is lost, the chances of being reunited are best if he has a collar with your contact information on it. A microchip is an excellent backup in case their collar or tags fall off (and a good idea all around.) If your dog is already microchipped then make sure your contact information is up to date.

 Alum Streaker never leaves home without his ID!

Alum Streaker never leaves home without his ID!

Use calming aids

If your dog is prone to anxiety or has already shown a particular fear of fireworks, you can utilize a number of different calming aids, such as a Thundershirt, calming treats and pheromone diffusers.

 Alum Vivi, cool as a cucumber in her thundershirt

Alum Vivi, cool as a cucumber in her thundershirt

Drown it out

If your dog will be home alone on the Fourth of July, leave some background noise on for your dog. A tv, radio or white noise machine can help drown out some of the fireworks.

 Alum Kevin (formally Sky) 

Alum Kevin (formally Sky) 

Be mindful of “overcelebrators”

Although the holiday is technically only one day, some people start celebrating in the days leading up to Fourth of July and shoot off their surplus fireworks in the days after. Be aware of these overachievers and keep a close eye on your dog in the days surrounding the Fourth.

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Adoptable Sally says "Be safe and have a happy Fourth of July!"